Fun

  • A light bulb joke that can be used in discussing how the choice of model might affect the conclusions drawn.  The joke was submitted to AmStat News by Robert Weiss from UCLA and appeared on page 48 of the October, 2018 edition.

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  • A joke to aid in discussing Confirmation Bias (bias introduced in surveys because respondents tend to interpret things in a way that confirms their preexisting beliefs).  The joke was written by Larry Lesser from The Universisty of Texas at El Paso and Dennis Pearl from The Pennsylvania State University in October, 2018.

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  • A joke to help in discussing Latin Square experimental designs. The joke was written by Larry Lesser from The University of Texas at El Paso in October, 2018.

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  • This song covers some major real-world examples in the history of random sampling. The lyric was written in 2017 by Lawrence M Lesser from The University of Texas at El Paso and can be sung to the tune of theHarry Casey and Richard Finch song “(Shake, Shake, Shake) Shake Your Booty” that was a 1976 #1 hit for KC and the Sunshine Band.

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  • A song about the Problem of Points, whose discussion in the 17th century led to the foundations of probability theory and expected value.  The lyric was written in 2017 by Lawrence M Lesser from The University of Texas at El Paso and may be sung tot he tune of the Sting #1 1983 Grammy-winning hit “Every Breath You Take”.

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  • A song to help students remember the empirical rule that it is rare to see an observation more than three sd's away from the mean, while about 19 out of 20 will fall within two sd's and about 2 out of 3 within one sd.  The lyrics were weritten in 2017 by Lawrence M Lesser from The University of Texas at El Paso and may be sung to the tune of "Material Girl" written by Peter Brown and Robert Rans and populartized by Madonna.

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  • Explore the Hubble Deep Fields from a statistical point of view.  Watch out for the booby traps of bias, the vagueness of variability, and the shiftiness of sample size as we travel on a photo safari through the Hubble Deep Fields (HDFs).

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  • A song for use in helping students identify factors to consider when deciding how outliers should be treated, as well as factors for deciding if a study is worthwhile.  Lyrics and music © 2016 by Greg Crowther.This song is part of an NSF-funded library of interactive songs that involved students creating responses to prompts that are then included in the lyrics (see www.causeweb.org/smiles for the interactive version of the song, a short reading covering the topic, and an assessment item).

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  • A song for use in helping students identify factors that allow a sample of data to be representative of the population and distinguish between random and convenience samples.  Lyrics © 2016 by Amy Adler, may be sung to the tune of “Miss Susie had a steamboat.”This song is part of an NSF-funded library of interactive songs that involved students creating responses to prompts that are then included in the lyrics (see www.causeweb.org/smiles for the interactive version of the song, a short reading covering the topic, and an assessment item).

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  • A song for use in helping students identify examples of biased (like the range) and unbiased (like the mean) estimators.  Lyrics © 2015 by Larry Lesser, music by Dominic Dousa. This song is part of an NSF-funded library of interactive songs that involved students creating responses to prompts that are then included in the lyrics (see www.causeweb.org/smiles for the interactive version of the song, a short reading covering the topic, and an assessment item).

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