pdf

  • This issue contains articles about Karl Pearson (150 years after his birth); finding more ways to make learning statistics fun; simulating capture-recapture sampling in Excel and by hand; common misconceptions in statistics; a correlation-based puzzler and a STATäó¢DOKU puzzle.
    0
    No votes yet
  • This issue contains articles on: The predictive model used by the website FiveThirtyEight.com during the 2008 Presidential election, the design and implementation of an election day exit poll by statistics students, a description of the randomization measures taken to ensure fairness and transparency in the awarding of development grants to farmers in the Republic of Georgia, an explanation of the Item-Matching problem and the Coupon-Collecting problem, together with R code for simulating both problems, and a review of the book, Applied Spatial Statistics for Public Health Data.
    0
    No votes yet
  • This issue contains articles on: The advantages and pitfalls of using online panel research, including a discussion of improving data quality and designing the survey research strategically, sequential sampling and testing in a "simple against simple" situation, including a description of Abraham Wald's historical and theoretical contributions to the theory, and R code for running simulations, and the experience and results of an exit poll conducted by two students in Washington D.C. during the 2008 presidential election.
    0
    No votes yet
  • The quiet statisticians have changed our world - not by discovering new facts or technical developments but by changing the ways we reason, experiment and form our opinions about it. is a quote by Canadian science philosopher Ian Hacking (1936-). The quote is found on page 70 of his 1984 "Science" article "Trial by number" (volume 84 p. 67-70)
    0
    No votes yet
  • Take nothing on its looks; take everything on evidence. There's no better rule. is a quote by English novelist Charles Dickens (1812 - 1870). The quote appears in chapter 40 of his popular novel "Great Expectations" written as a weekly serial from December 1860 to August 1861. The line was spoken in the novel by Mr. Jaggers to Pip.
    0
    No votes yet
  • Whatever the progress of human knowledge, there will always be room for ignorance, hence for chance and probability. is a quote by French mathematician Emile Borel (1871 - 1956). The quote may be found on page 12 of his 1914 book "Le hasard"
    0
    No votes yet
  • The world of science lives fairly comfortably with paradox. We know that light is a wave and also that light is a particle. The discoveries made in the infinitely small world of particle physics indicate randomness and chance, and I do not find it any more difficult to live with the paradox of a universe of randomness and chance and a universe of pattern and purpose than I do with light as a wave and light as a particle. Living with contradiction is nothing new to the human being is a quote by American young adult fiction author Madeline L'Engle (1918-2007). The quote is on page 125 of her 1988 book "Two-Part Invention: The Story of a Marriage".
    0
    No votes yet
  • Mathematics alone make us feel the limits of our intelligence. For we can always suppose in the case of an experiment that it is inexplicable because we don't happen to have all the data. In mathematics we have all the data and yet we don't understand. is a quote by French philosopher and political activist Simone Weil (1909-1943). The quote may be found on page 511 of the second volume of "Simone Weil's Notebooks" first published in English in 1956 (translated by Arthur Willis).
    0
    No votes yet
  • November 23, 2010 Activity Webinar presented by Stacey Hancock, Reed College, Jennifer Noll, Portland State University, Sean Simpson, Westchester Community College, and Aaron Weinberg, Ithaca College, and hosted by Leigh Slauson, Capital University. Extra materials available for download free of charge. Many instructors ask students to demonstrate the frequentist notion of probability using a simulation early in an intro stats course. Typically, the simulation involves dice or coins, which give equal (and known) probabilities. How about a simulation involving an unknown probability? This webinar discusses an experiment involving rolling (unbalanced) pigs. Since the probabilities are not equal, this experiment also allows the instructor to have students think about the concept of fairness within games.
    0
    No votes yet
  • October 26, 2010 Activity Webinar presented by Tisha Hooks, Winona State University and hosted by Leigh Slauson, Capital University. Extra materials available to download free of charge. The purpose of this webinar is to introduce an activity to enhance students' understanding of various descriptive measures. In particular, by completing this hands-on activity students will experience a visual interpretation of a mean, median, outlier, and the concept of distance-to-mean.
    0
    No votes yet

Pages

list