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  • Inside every nonBayesian there is a Bayesian struggling to get out. is a quote by British Bayesian Statistician Dennis V. Lindley (1923- ). The quote is also cited on page 497 of E.T. Jaynes 2003 book "Probability Theory: The Logic of Science".
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  • Avoid Linear extrapolation ... The turkey's first 1000 days are a seemingly unending succession of gradually improving circumstances confirmed by daily experience. What happens on Day 1001? Thanksgiving. The quote is by John E. Sener (1954 - ) of Sener Learning services found in the on-line article "Strategies for Effective `20/20 Vision` -- #1: Avoid Linear Extrapolation" at www.senerlearning.net/?q=node/176. The quote is paraphrasing the turkey metaphor made famous by Bertrand Russell and Nassim Nicholas Taleb.
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  • This joke can be used in a discussion of how sample size affects the reliability of the sample mean. The joke may be found amongst the extensive Science Jokes resources at www.newyorkscienceteacher.com
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  • In earlier times they had no statistics and so they had to fall back on lies. This is a quote by Canadian economist Stephen Leacock (1869 - 1944). The quote is found on page 265 of his 1938 book "In Model Memoirs and Other Sketches from Simple to Serious"
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  • Always expect to find at least one error when you proofread your own statistics. If you don't, you are probably making the same mistake twice. Quote of american demographer Cheryl Russell appearing in "Rules of Thumb" by Tom Parker (Houghton Mifflin, 1983) p. 124. Also to be found in "Statistically Speaking the dictionary of quotations" compiled by Carl Gaither and Alma Cavazos-Gaither p. 81
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  • We can never achieve absolute truth but we can live hopefully by a system of calculated probabilities. The law of probability gives to natural and human sciences - to human experience as a whole - the unity of life we seek. Quote of American educator Agnes E Meyer (1887 - 1970) appearing in her book "Education for a New Morality" (MacMillan, 1957) p. 21. Also to be found in "Statistically Speaking the dictionary of quotations" compiled by Carl Gaither and Alma Cavazos-Gaither p. 131
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  • Are no probabilities to be accepted, merely because they are not certainties. Quote of English novelist Jane Austen (1775 - 1817) appearing in her book "Sense and Sensibility, volume 1" (T. Egerton, 1811) p. 41. The quote was spoken by the character Mrs. Dashwood in a conversation with her daughter Elinor. Also to be found in "Statistically Speaking the dictionary of quotations" compiled by Carl Gaither and Alma Cavazos-Gaither p. 159
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  • This song describes the benefits of using a prior distribution to capture information already known about a topic under study. The lyrics are by Mark Glickman and may be sung to the tune of The Shocking Blue's 1969 song "Venus." The accomanying mp3 recording was produced on May 17, 2008 (Mark Glickman - vocal and guitar)
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  • This song extols the value of Bayesian thinking. The song was written by Mark Glickman and may be sung to the tune of The Zombie's 1968 song "Time of the Season" written by Rod Argent. The mp3 was recorded on May 24 2008 (Mark Glickman - vocals). This song was first performed live in June 2006 at "Eighth Valencia World Meeting on Bayesian Statistics" in Benidorm, Spain, by Mark Glickman, Brad Carlin, Jennifer Hill, and David Heckerman.
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  • This song describes the pitfalls of using a steep prior in a Bayesian analysis that is not based on an underlying understanding of the problem. The lyrics were written by Mark Glickman and may be sung to the tune of The Four Seasons' 1975 song "December, 1963 (Oh What a Night)" written by Bob Gaudio and Judy Parker. The mp3 was recorded July 9, 2008 (Mark Glickman - vocals).
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