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  • In this 20 minute video, doctor and researcher Hans Rosling uses his fascinating data-bubble software to burst myths about the developing world. The video includes new analysis on China and the post-bailout world, mixed with classic data shows.

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  • March 23, 2010 Activity webinar presented by John Gabrosek & Paul Stephenson, Grand Valley State University and hosted by Leigh Slauson, Capital University. GOLO is a dice-based golf game that simulates playing a round of golf. GOLO can be used to illustrate basic probability concepts, descriptive summaries for data, discrete probability distributions, order statistics, and game theory. Participants had a chance to play the online version of GOLO.
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  • April 27, 2010 Activity webinar presented by Shonda Kuiper, Grinnell College, and hosted by Leigh Slauson, Capital University. Educational games have had varied success in the past. However, what it means to incorporate games into the classroom has changed dramatically in the last 10 years. The goals of these games are to 1) foster a sense of engagement, 2) have a low threat of failure, 3) allow instructors to create simplified models of the world around us, and 4) motivate students to learn. This webinar uses the same reaction time game to demonstrate a simple 1- 2 day activity that is appropriate for introductory courses as well as an advanced project that encourages students to experience data analysis as it is actually practiced in multiple disciplines. In the introductory activity students are asked to spend 15 minutes playing an on-line game. Data collected from the game is used to demonstrate the importance of proper data collection and appropriate statistical analysis. The advanced project asks students to read primary literature, plan and carry out game based experiments, and present their results.
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  • Many introductory Statistics courses consist of two main components: lecture sections and computer laboratory sections. In the computer labs, students often review fundamental course concepts, learn to analyze data using statistical software, and practice applying their knowledge to real world scenarios. Lab time could be better utilized if students arrived with 1) prior exposure to the core statistical ideas, and 2) a basic familiarity with the statistical software package. To achieve these objectives, PreLabs have been integrated into an introductory statistics course. A simple screen capture software (Jing) was used to create videos. The videos and a very short corresponding assignment together form a PreLab and are made available to students to access at appropriate times in the course. Some PreLabs were created to expose the students to statistical software details. Other PreLabs incorporate an available online learning resource or applet which allows students to gain a deeper understanding of a course concept through simulation and visualization. Not all on-line learning resources are ready to use 'as in' in a course. Some may be lacking a preface or description on how they are to be used; others may use slightly different notation or language than your students are accustomed to; a few may even contain an error or item that needs some clarification. One solution to such difficulties was to create a video wrapper so students can see how the applet works while receiving guidance from the instructor. In this webinar we will share the success story of how one introductory Statistics course integrated these video wrappers into the course and the discuss other possible applications.

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  • It's Just STATA Code To Me is a song written by Dorry Segev of Johns Hopkins University that reflects on a number of issues in biostatistical data analysis. The song may be sung to the tune of Billy Joel's 1980 hit song "It's Still Rock and Roll To Me." The lyrics were written for Marie DIener-West's Biostatistics 653 course at Johns Hopkins that regularly asks students to create songs, videos, and poetry with biostatistics themes.

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  • This short article begins with a brief explanation of 3D barcodes (what they are and how they are used), and then provides an argument for why statistics should be studied and how statistics is a part of everyday life. Several links are shared for other resources related to teaching and learning statistics, in addition to a link to a career options in statistics.
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  • A sketch by Anastasia Mandel reinterpreting "Boy Viewing Mount Fuji" by Katsushika Hokusai (1839) with the statistical caption "Laplace distribution in the Far East." This is part of a collection of sketches by Anastasia Mandel and their accompanying statistical captions written by Stan Lipovetsky and Igor Mandel that took first place in the cartoon & art category of the 2009 A-Mu-sing contest sponsored by CAUSE. The collection and their accompanying statistical captions discussed in the paper "How art helps to understand statistics" (Model Assisted Statistics and Applications, 2009) by Stan Lipovetsky and Igor Mandel in volume 4 pages 313-324. Free to use in classrooms and on course websites.

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  • This webinar, presented by Larry Lesser of University of Texas at El Paso, provided a tour of the new CAUSEWeb fun page, showing some sample songs, jokes, and cartoons. Participants engaged in a discussion of the pedagogical issues involved in teaching with humor and were provided resources and a bibliography on the topic. Watch the webinar to learn how to make learning fun! (recorded April 11, 2006)
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  • Webinar recorded May 9, 2006 presented by Carl Lee of Central Michigan University and hosted by Jackie Miller of The Ohio State University. Do you use hands-on activities in your class? Would you be interested in using data collected by students from different classes at different institutions? Would you be interested in sharing your students' data with others? Does it take more time than you would like to spend in your class for hands-on activities? Do you have to enter the hands-on activity data yourself after the class period? If your answer to any of the above questions is "YES", then, this Real-Time Online Database approach should be beneficial to your class. In this presentation, Dr. Lee (1) introduces the real-time online database (stat.cst.cmich.edu/statact) funded by a NSF/CCL grant, (2) demonstrates how to use the real-time database to teach introductory statistics using two of the real-time activities and (3) shares with you some of the assessment activities including activity work sheets and projects.
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  • Webinar presented by Roger Woodard of North Carolina State University and Ginger Rowell of Middle Tennessee State University and hosted by Jackie Miller of The Ohio State University on June 13, 2006. Many people would like to use online resources in their classrooms. However, the typical online applet does not have supporting materials that allow the teacher to introduce them into the classroom. Instructors that simply point students to a website without specific instructions and planning may find that the students do not achieve the desired learning outcomes from using the applet. In this webinar Dr. Woodard presented a basic framework that instructors can use to plan and implement the use of online materials in the classroom. These are illustrated with examples that have been field tested in courses at NCSU and at MTSU.
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