Sorry, you need to enable JavaScript to visit this website.

Professional

  • This online application allows the user to import data from online resources such as Facebook, Google Analytics, GitHub, as well as spreadsheets on their own computers. They can then drag-and-drop variables to make graphs automatically. The basic version is free, but you can upgrade to a paid version which allows combining data across services and, if the data come from an online resource, the user has the choice to have Data Hub keep the graphs updated as the data changes.
    0
    No votes yet
  • This software makes it easier to use the R language. It includes a code debugger, editing, and visualization tools.

    0
    No votes yet
  • This is a web application framework for R, in which you can write and publish web apps without knowing HTML, Java, etc. You create two .R files: one that controls the user interface, and one that controls what the app does. The site contains examples of Shiny apps, a tutorial on how to get started, and information on how to have your apps hosted, if you don't have a server.

    0
    No votes yet
  • This online booklet comes out of the Mosaic project. It is a guide aimed at students in an introductory statistics class. After a chapter on getting started, the chapters are grouped around what kind of variable is being analyzed. One quantitative variable; one categorical variable; two quantitative variables; two categorical variables; quantitative response, categorical predictor; categorical response, quantitative predictor; and survival time outcomes.
    0
    No votes yet
  • The Comprehensive Epidemiologic Data Resource is a collection of data sets. It includes definitions of each variable in the data set. It requires a login to retrieve the data sets. Registering involves giving your name and address and the name of the study and a detailed description of the intended use of the data.
    0
    No votes yet
  • This software allows you to extract data from published graphs. There is a web-based app and a downloadable version. First, you provide the software with a picture of the graph in question. Then you give it two points on the x-axis and two points on the y-axis for reference. Then you click on the points on the graph that you want to extract. The points are put into a .csv file.

    0
    No votes yet
  • A cartoon for use in celebrations of Random Acts of Kindness Day which is an unofficial holiday in many countries typically celebrated in February. Cartoon by John Landers (www.landers.co.uk) based on the suggested illustrating text and concept from Larry Lesser (The University of Texas at El Paso). The cartoon was first displayed on the website http://www.worldofstatistics.org on Random Acts of Kindness day in February 2014. Free to use in the classroom and on course web sites or other non-profit teaching uses.

    0
    No votes yet
  • There is no such thing as luck; there is only adequate or inadequate preparation to cope with a statistical universe. is a quote by American Science fiction writer Robert Anson Heinlein (1907-1988). The quote appears at the begiining of section 2 of his 1958 serialized novel "Have Space Suit - Will Travel".

    0
    No votes yet
  • ...statisticians are the new sexy vampires, only even more pasty. A quote by American playwright, columnist, and humorist Paul M. Rudnick (1957 - ) from his November 19, 2012 essay "A Date with Nate" in "The New Yorker". The essay arose after the correct prediction of the winner of the presidential race in all 50 states in 2012 by statistician Nate Silver

    0
    No votes yet
  • A joke that can be used when teaching six sigma process control ideas or chi-squared goodness-of-fit tests. The joke was written in 2013.

    0
    No votes yet

Pages

register