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Grades 7 - 9

  • The STatistics Education Web, also called STEW, is an online collection of peer-reviewed statistics lesson plans for K-12 teachers. The web site is maintained by the ASA and accessible to K-12 teachers throughout the world. Lessons cover a wide range of probability and statistics topics.
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  • This webpage provides an active learning lesson for linear regression. Resources include an in-class student activity sheet for two different levels of classes (Algebra I and Junior), a PowerPoint showing faces of famous people, and sheet with updated (to the end of current year) actual ages of the celebrities.
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  • A set of twenty statistics anagrams that might be used for an end of semester terminology review. This collection of anagrams appeared in the article "Even More Fun Learning Stats" by Lawrence M. Lesser in issue #49 (2007) of "Stats" magazine (pp.5-8,19, 27).

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  • This applet is designed to approximate the value of Pi. It accomplishes this purpose by firing random data points at a circle inscribed within a square. The probability of a data point landing within the circle is a ratio of the circle's area to the area of the square.

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  • Explore the functionality of your scientific calculator.

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  • The Caesar Shift is a translation of the alphabet; for example, a five-letter shift would code the letter a as f, b as g, ... z as e. We describe a five-step process for decoding an encrypted message. First, groups of size 4 construct a frequency table of the letters in two lines of a coded message. Second, students construct a bar chart for a reference message of the frequency of letters in the English language. Third, students create a bar chart of the coded message. Fourth, students visually compare the bar chart of the reference message (step 2) to the bar chart of the coded message (step 3). Based on this comparison, students hypothesize a shift. Fifth, students apply the shift to the coded message. After decoding the message, students are asked a series of questions that assess their ability to see patterns. The questions are geared for higher levels of cognitive reasoning. Key words: bar charts, Caesar Shift, encryption, testing hypotheses

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  • The activity is designed to help students develop a better intuitive understanding of what is meant by variability in statistics. Emphasis is placed on the standard deviation as a measure of variability. As they learn about the standard deviation, many students focus on the variability of bar heights in a histogram when asked to compare the variability of two distributions. For these students, variability refers to the "variation" in bar heights. Other students may focus only on the range of values, or the number of bars in a histogram, and conclude that two distributions are identical in variability even when it is clearly not the case. This activity can help students discover that the standard deviation is a measure of the density of values about the mean of a distribution and to become more aware of how clusters, gaps, and extreme values affect the standard deviation. Key words: Variability, standard deviation

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  • This applet simulates rolling dice and displays the outcomes in a histogram. Students can choose to roll 1, 2, 6, or 9 dice either 1, 10, 20, or 100 times. The outcome studied is the sum of the dice and a red line is drawn on the histogram to show expected number of occurences of each outcome.

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