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Building Blocks

  • RStudio Cloud makes it easy for professionals, hobbyists, trainers, teachers and students to do, share, teach and learn data science using R.  Create analyses using RStudio directly from your browser - there is no software to install and nothing to configure on your computer.  Share your projects - and access those of others - without worrying about data transfer or package installation. Each project defines its own environment, and RStudio Cloud automatically reproduces that environment whenever anyone accesses the project.  It’s easy to share analyses with the world - but it’s also simple to collaborate with a select group in a private space. You control who can enter a space - and via roles, you have fine grained control over what each user can do.  There are also many learning materials available: interactive tutorials covering the basics of data science, cheatsheets for working with popular R packages, links to Datacamp courses, and a guide to using RStudio Cloud.

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  • swirl is a software package for the R programming language that turns the R console into an interactive learning environment. Users receive immediate feedback as they are guided through self-paced lessons in data science and R programming.

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  • Everyday, massive amounts of data are generated in every part of our lives. That makes data fluency an indispensable skill to help you succeed - no matter what industry you’re in -- and DataCamp is here to help.  With bite-sized lessons in how to use R, Python, and SQL for data science, DataCamp allows you to learn in a way that fits your schedule, on any device.

    9 courses are available for those who create a free account, and 123 courses are available for individuals who sign up for a $29/month membership ($25/month is you pay yearly).  Businesses can also pay $300 per member per year for employees to learn these skills.

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  • These cheat sheets make it easy to learn about and use some of the favorite packages of RStudio. 

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  • This compendium facilitates the creation of good graphs by presenting a set of concrete examples, ranging from the trivial to the advanced. The graphs can all be reproduced and adjusted by copy-pasting code into the R console. Almost every example in this compendium is driven by the same philosophy: A good graph is a simple graph, in the Einsteinian sense that a graph should be made as simple as possible, but not simpler.  A note for R fans: the majority of our plots have been created in base R, but you will encounter some examples in ggplot.

     

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  • This resource is designed to provide new users to R, RStudio, and R Markdown with the introductory steps needed to begin their own reproducible research. Many screenshots and screencasts (with no audio) will be included, but if further clarification is needed on these or any other aspect of the book, please create a GitHub issue here or email me with a reference to the error/area where more guidance is necessary.  It is recommended that you have R version 3.3.0 or later, RStudio Desktop version 1.0 or higher, and rmarkdown R package version 1.0 or higher. 

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  • These handouts/links give a foundational understanding of how to set up and use R

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  • This is a web application framework for R, in which you can write and publish web apps without knowing HTML, Java, etc. You create two .R files: one that controls the user interface, and one that controls what the app does. The site contains examples of Shiny apps, a tutorial on how to get started, and information on how to have your apps hosted, if you don't have a server.

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  • Many introductory Statistics courses consist of two main components: lecture sections and computer laboratory sections. In the computer labs, students often review fundamental course concepts, learn to analyze data using statistical software, and practice applying their knowledge to real world scenarios. Lab time could be better utilized if students arrived with 1) prior exposure to the core statistical ideas, and 2) a basic familiarity with the statistical software package. To achieve these objectives, PreLabs have been integrated into an introductory statistics course. A simple screen capture software (Jing) was used to create videos. The videos and a very short corresponding assignment together form a PreLab and are made available to students to access at appropriate times in the course. Some PreLabs were created to expose the students to statistical software details. Other PreLabs incorporate an available online learning resource or applet which allows students to gain a deeper understanding of a course concept through simulation and visualization. Not all on-line learning resources are ready to use 'as in' in a course. Some may be lacking a preface or description on how they are to be used; others may use slightly different notation or language than your students are accustomed to; a few may even contain an error or item that needs some clarification. One solution to such difficulties was to create a video wrapper so students can see how the applet works while receiving guidance from the instructor. In this webinar we will share the success story of how one introductory Statistics course integrated these video wrappers into the course and the discuss other possible applications.

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  • This website is compilation of data from sources such as the CIA World Factbook, UN, and OECD. You can generate maps and graphs to statistically compare and research Nations.

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