Sorry, you need to enable JavaScript to visit this website.

Javascript

  • A cartoon to teach about the average and about positive versus negative skew. The cartoon was created by Diane L. Evans from Rose-Human Institute of Technology and won an honorable mention in the CAUSE 2013 A-Mu-sing contest.
    0
    No votes yet
  • A poem for use in teaching that causation is not correlation and the Pearson Chi-Square test. The poem was written by Dr. Nyaradzo Mvududu of the Seattle Pacific University School of Education. The poem won a prize in the 2013 CAUSE A-Mu-sing competition.
    0
    No votes yet
  • A video to teach about the central limit theorem and various issues in one-sample hypothesis testing. The lyrics and video were created by Scott Crawford from the University of Wyoming. The music is from the 1988 song "I'm Gonna Be (500 miles)" by the Scottish band The Proclaimers. The video took second place in the video category of the 2013 CAUSE A-Mu-sing competition. Free for non-profit use in classroom and course website applications.
    0
    No votes yet
  • A video to teach about principles of Analysis of Variance. The lyrics and video were created by Scott Crawford from the University of Wyoming. The music is from the 1984 song "Hallelujah" by Canadian songwriter Leonard Cohen. The video took third place in the video category of the 2013 CAUSE A-Mu-sing competition. Free for non-profit use in classroom and course website applications.
    0
    No votes yet
  • A video to dispel myths about Statistics and excite students early in a course. The lyrics and video were created by Scott Crawford from the University of Wyoming. The music is from the 2000 song "Where Are You, Christmas? " written by James Horner and Will Jennings for the movie "How the Grinch Stole Christmas". The video received an honorable mention in the video category of the 2013 CAUSE A-Mu-sing competition. Free for non-profit use in classroom and course website applications.
    0
    No votes yet
  • Calibrated Peer Review (CPR) is a program, for networked computers, that enables frequent writing assignments without any increase in instructor work. In fact, CPR can reduce the time an instructor now spends reading and assessing student writing. CPR offers instructors the choice of creating their own writing assignments or using the rapidly expanding assignment library. If you believe in constructivist learning, writing is the most important tool that you have. But if you have a class of 300 students, grading essays challenges even the true believer. Calibrated Peer Review (CPR)can be used in classes of any size. CPR is based on the model of peer review in science. The student reads a document, either on-line or hard copy, then writes about it. When the student has demonstrated competence as a reviewer, the program delivers three peer documents on for review. The student answers content and style questions and assigns scores. Finally, the student does a self-review. The student grade comes from writing and reviewing. Even though the program is only in its third year, approximately 100,000 students have used it. Although CPR was designed for use in large chemistry classes, experience has shown that it can serve in many other disciplines, as well. Currently, business, chemistry, economics, English, and life science instructors are using CPR in college, graduate and professional, high schools and middle schools. CPR was developed in the Chemistry Department at U.C.L.A. with funding provided by the National Science Foundation and Howard Hughes Medical Institute.

    0
    No votes yet
  • StatKey is the analysis package to accompany the textbook "Statistics: Unlocking the Power of Data." StatKey includes interactive applets to describe and graph data, engage in bootstrapping and randomization tests, and explore sampling distributions and theoretical distributions.

    5
    Average: 5 (1 vote)
  • The conception of chance enters in the very first steps of scientific activity in virtue of the fact that no observation is absolutely correct. I think chance is a more fundamental conception that causality; for whether in a concrete case, a cause-effect relation holds or not can only be judged by applying the laws of chance to the observation. is a quote by German and British nobel prize winning physicist Max Born (1882 - 1970). The quote appears in his 1949 book "Natural Philosophy of Cause and Chance" published by Clarendon Press.
    0
    No votes yet
  • The researcher armed with a confidence interval, but deprived of the false respectability of statistical significance, must work harder to convince himself and others of the importance of his findings. This can only be good. is a quote by British statistician Michael W. Oakes. The quote is found in his 1986 book "Statistical Inference: a Commentary for the Social and Behavioural Sciences" published by John Wiley & Sons.
    0
    No votes yet
  • There is a magic in graphs. The profile of a curve reveals in a flash a whole situation - the life history of an epidemic, a panic, or an era of prosperity. The curve informs the mind, awakens the imagination, convinces. is a quote by Henry David Hubbard (1870-1943) who was the first secretary of the National Bureau of Standards; serving from 1901 to 1938. The quote appears in his introduction to the 1939 book "Graphic Presentation" by William Brinton. The entire one-page essay by Mr. Hubbard is an outstanding description of the value of graphical displays and can be found at http://www.archive.org/stream/graphicpresentat00brinrich#page/2/mode/1up
    0
    No votes yet

Pages

list