Lifelong learners

  • This tutorial on SQL teaches the most used commands. There is a short explanation, then the user is asked a simple question. If the typed answer is correct, the user continues to the next lesson.
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  • The Census Bureau has made many data visualizations of the data it collects. It is a good collections of maps, treemaps, an age/sex pyramid, and of course more familiar graphs, like bar graphs.
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  • Rseek.org is a search engine for R resources. Type any topic in the search box, and get resources that are R specific. You can further narrow your search to just articles, books, packages, support, or "for beginners."
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  • This online software allows you to load data and make professional-looking graphs with it. Graph types are basic (scatterplot, line plot, bar charts, etc.), statistical (histograms, box plots), scientific (error bars, heat map, contour), 3D charts, and financial (e.g. time series). Other graphs are available with the paid pro version. Log in is required, which allows you to upload data and save it for next use.
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  • This online application allows the user to import data from online resources such as Facebook, Google Analytics, GitHub, as well as spreadsheets on their own computers. They can then drag-and-drop variables to make graphs automatically. The basic version is free, but you can upgrade to a paid version which allows combining data across services and, if the data come from an online resource, the user has the choice to have Data Hub keep the graphs updated as the data changes.
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  • This software makes it easier to use the R language. It includes a code debugger, editing, and visualization tools.
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  • This online booklet comes out of the Mosaic project. It is a guide aimed at students in an introductory statistics class. After a chapter on getting started, the chapters are grouped around what kind of variable is being analyzed. One quantitative variable; one categorical variable; two quantitative variables; two categorical variables; quantitative response, categorical predictor; categorical response, quantitative predictor; and survival time outcomes.
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  • This site is an interactive, online tutorial for R. It asks the user to type in commands at an R prompt, which are then evaluated. Typing the right thing allows the user to continue on, typing the wrong thing yields an error. The user cannot skip the easier lessons. Lessons are: Using R; Vectors; Matrices; Summary Statistics; Factors; Data Frames; Real-World Data; and What’s Next.
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  • A reference for analyzing large, complex data sets. Helpful for various levels of students.
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  • A joke to introduce the idea of asymptotic distributions. The joke was written by Dennis Pearl of The Ohio State University.
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