Sorry, you need to enable JavaScript to visit this website.

Resource Library

Statistical Topic

Advanced Search | Displaying 41 - 50 of 2046
  • A cartoon suitable for use in teaching about the idea of a falsifiable hypothesis. The cartoon is number 2078 from the webcomic series at xkcd.com created by Randall Munroe. Free to use in the classroom and on course web sites under a creative commons attribution-non-commercial 2.5 license.

    0
    No votes yet
  • A cartoon suitable for use in teaching about cohort effects versus age effects in epidemiological studies. The cartoon is number 2080 from the webcomic series at xkcd.com created by Randall Munroe. Free to use in the classroom and on course web sites under a creative commons attribution-non-commercial 2.5 license.

    0
    No votes yet
  • A joke to help in discussing Latin Square experimental designs. The joke was written by Larry Lesser from The University of Texas at El Paso in November, 2018.

    0
    No votes yet
  • A song to introduce the basic idea of using simulation to calculate a P-value for a randomization test (by simulating lots of group assignments and seeing what proportion of them give more extreme test statistics than observed with the actual group assignments).  The lyrics were written in November 2018 by Larry Lesser from The University of Texas at El Paso and Dennis Pearl from Penn State University. May be sung to the tune of the 1980 number #1 song “Celebration” by Kool and the Gang.

    0
    No votes yet
  • A song to be used in discussing the idea that the null hypothesis represents the model of no effect (with several common examples). The original music and lyrics were written in 2017 by Greg Crowther from Everett Community College. The song won an honorable mention in the 2017 A-mu-sing contest. In the current 2018 version the music is by Greg Crowther and the revised lyrics and vocals are by Greg Crowther and Larry Lesser from University of Texas at El Paso.

    4
    Average: 4 (1 vote)
  • A Cartoon to illustrate the idea of interaction (cell means) plots for a two factor ANOVA.  The cartoon was created in October 2018 by Larry Lesser from The University of Texas at El Paso.  

    0
    No votes yet
  • A cartoon to be used for in discussing the Poisson model for the number of rare events in a fixed amount of time. The cartoon was used in the August 2018 CAUSE Cartoon Caption Contest. This caption received an honorable mention. The drawing was created by British cartoonist John Landers based on an idea from Dennis Pearl of Penn State University. The winning caption  in the August competition was "Always read the full informed consent document before signing up to be in a matched-pairs experiment," written by Greg Snow from Brigham Young University and may be found at https://www.causeweb.org/cause/resources/fun/cartoons/twins

    0
    No votes yet
  • A cartoon to be used for in discussing human subjects issues during a unit on designing experiments. The cartoon was used in the August 2018 CAUSE Cartoon Caption Contest. This winning caption was submitted by Greg Snow from Brigham Young University. The drawing was created by British cartoonist John Landers based on an idea from Dennis Pearl of Penn State University. An honorable mention for a caption that also rose to the top of the judging in the August competition was "The Poisson model for rare events was about to be tested," which may be found at https://www.causeweb.org/cause/resources/fun/cartoons/twins-ii

    0
    No votes yet
  • A joke to help in discussing the Geometric and Hypergeometric probability distributions.  A version of the joke was submitted to AmStat News by Sara Venkatraman, a student at Cornell University and appeared in the October, 2018 issue.  The joke was modified to relate the hypergeometric distribution to sampling without replacement by the CAUSEweb fun collection editors (Dennis Peaaerl and Larry Lesser).

    0
    No votes yet
  • A joke to aid in discussing Confirmation Bias (bias introduced in surveys because respondents tend to interpret things in a way that confirms their preexisting beliefs).  The joke was written by Larry Lesser from The Universisty of Texas at El Paso and Dennis Pearl from The Pennsylvania State University in October, 2018.

    0
    No votes yet

Pages

list