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  • Has the following features: -Fast drawing mode with lower resolution for high performance real-time display - Slow drawing mode for high resolution, high quality printing, image output etc. - Output of charts in EPS,PS, as BufferedImage and (planned) PNG,SVG etc. - Linear, logarithmic and wrapped axes with auto scale. - Scatter plot, Contour plot; - Plots are fully configurable allowing all advantages of Java2D: Transparency, Scaling, Rotating, Clipping... - Text console allowing full control for keyboard lovers (planned) - Use console or pipe for in-/output (planned)
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  • This applet allows a person to add up to 50 points onto its green viewing screen. After each point is added by clicking on the screen with the mouse, a red line will appear. This red line represents a line passing through (Average x, Average y) with a slope that can be altered by clicking the Left or Right buttons. The slope of this line may also be changed by dragging the mouse either right or left. By clicking on Show Best Fit, a blue best fit line will be calculated by the computer.
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  • Gives some background on the Buffon needle problem. Has a link to an applet that allows one to simulate dropping a needle1, 10, 100, or 1000 times. One also has control over the length of the needle.
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  • Poses the following problem: Suppose there was one of six prizes inside your favorite box of cereal. Perhaps it's a pen, a plastic movie character, or a picture card. How many boxes of cereal would you expect to have to buy, to get all six prizes?
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  • Students explore the definition and interpretations of the probability of an event by investigating the long run proportion of times a sum of 8 is obtained when two balanced dice are rolled repeatedly. Making use of hand calculations, computer simulations, and descriptive techniques, students encounter the laws of large numbers in a familiar setting. By working through the exercises, students will gain a deeper understanding of the qualitative and quantitative relationships between theoretical probability and long run relative frequency. Particularly, students investigate the proximity of the relative frequency of an event to its probability and conclude, from data, the order on which the dispersion of the relative frequency diminishes. Key words: probability, law of large numbers, simulation, estimation
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  • An applet explores the following problem: A long day hiking through the Grand Canyon has discombobulated this tourist. Unsure of which way he is randomly stumbling, 1/3 of his steps are towards the edge of the cliff, while 2/3 of his steps are towards safety. From where he stands, one step forward will send him tumbling down. What is the probability that he can escape unharmed?
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  • This applet is designed to approximate the value of Pi. It accomplishes this purpose by firing random data points at a circle inscribed within a square. The probability of a data point landing within the circle is a ratio of the circle's area to the area of the square.
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  • This applet, for which the source code is available, lets you mark the locations of ordered pairs, (x, y), on the left screen, and then the applet determines the equation of the regression line and graphs it. The applet will also show confidence bands for means of y corresponding to a given x, and prediction bands for future values of y corresponding to a given value x. Note: the applet opens in a seperate window when you open the webpage.
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  • This is a "Building Block" for the Buffon Needle problem. The source code and compile code are included as well as separate files for each. Users able to test the applet to determine if it meets their needs.
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  • In this free online video program, "students will discover how to convert the standard normal and use the standard deviation; how to use a table of areas to compute relative frequencies; how to find any percentile; and how a computer creates a normal quartile plot to determine whether a distribution is normal. Vehicle emissions standards and medical studies of cholesterol provide real-life examples."
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